BABY FORMULA
  • 5 Reasons European Baby Formula Is Superior

    5 Reasons European Baby Formula Is Superior

    Choosing the right baby formula is a critical decision for parents. Amidst a sea of options, European baby formulas distinctly stand out, providing exceptional nutritional quality. Here are the top five reasons that make European baby formulas, such as HiPP, a superior choice:

     

    #1. Keeps Your Baby Satiated Through Stages for Each Age

    European baby formulas cater to the changing nutritional needs of growing infants at every stage of their early life. They are specifically formulated to offer the perfect balance of nutrients that ensure your baby is satiated and well-nourished. These formulas are nutritionally complete, ensuring your baby receives the right proportions of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals necessary for their overall growth and development.

    In each stage of growth, the nutritional needs of a baby change. Unlike many other formulas, European baby formulas like HiPP understand this and offer stage-specific products. These stage-specific formulas adjust their nutritional profiles to match the developing digestive systems of babies at different ages, ensuring optimal nutrient absorption and digestion.

     

    #2. Mimics Real Breastmilk to Aid Digestion and Counter Constipation

    One of the incredible features of European formulas is their close resemblance to breast milk, both in composition and benefits. European formulas like HiPP are scientifically designed to mimic the nutritional profile of breast milk, aiding digestion and reducing the risk of constipation.

    Breast milk is recognized as the gold standard in infant nutrition. The aim of European baby formulas is to come as close as possible to this benchmark. They contain vital nutrients and bioactive compounds, such as prebiotics and probiotics, to support the baby's gut health, aiding in digestion, enhancing immunity, and reducing the risk of constipation and other digestive issues.

     

    #3. Free of Artificial Additives

    European baby formulas stand out for their commitment to natural ingredients. They strictly refrain from using artificial preservatives, flavors, colors, or sweeteners, providing a pure and wholesome diet for your baby.

    The absence of artificial additives in European baby formulas promotes better health and reduces the risk of allergies and intolerance. These formulas focus on including high-quality, organic ingredients that ensure your baby is exposed to fewer harmful chemicals and pesticides. This commitment to natural, wholesome ingredients is an example of the high standards set by European baby formulas.

     

    #4. No Corn Syrup as a Source of Energy

    Rather than using corn syrup, European baby formulas employ lactose, the primary carbohydrate found in breast milk, as their primary source of energy. This not only ensures the energy provided to your baby is derived from a natural source, but it also aids digestion and supports a healthy gut microbiome.

    Corn syrup, found in many non-European baby formulas, has been linked to increased risks of obesity and diabetes. By avoiding this ingredient, European baby formulas offer a healthier option. Lactose, on the other hand, offers a variety of benefits, including enhancing calcium absorption, which is essential for the development of strong bones and teeth.

     

    #5. Strict Quality Control and GMO-Free

    European baby formulas are manufactured under some of the most stringent regulations globally, ensuring the highest quality and safety standards. These regulations oversee everything from the quality of the ingredients to the manufacturing process, setting the bar high for baby formula standards.

    Moreover, European regulations strictly forbid the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in baby formulas. GMOs are controversial due to their potential impact on human health and the environment. European baby formulas' commitment to being GMO-free assures parents that their babies are receiving the purest and safest nutrition possible.

     

    Conclusion

    Choosing a European baby formula, like HiPP Combiotic, means opting for a product that prioritizes your baby's nutritional needs at every stage, simulates the benefits of breast milk, excludes artificial additives, and uses natural sources of energy. Remember, it's essential to consult your pediatrician before introducing or changing your baby's formula.

     

    What Is The Best Organic Baby Formula?

    If you are thinking about finding the best organic baby formula we recommend you read our article https://organicsbestshop.com/blogs/organicsbestclub/best-organic-baby-formula.

    Read Our Best Organic Baby Formula 2023 Article 

     

     

    References

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    2. Koletzko B, et al. (2016). Can infant feeding choices modulate later obesity risk? Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89:1502S–8S. (https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/89/5/1502S/4596953)

    3. European Commission - Food Safety. (2017). Infant formulae and follow-on formulae. (https://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/labelling_nutrition/special_groups_food/children_en)

    4. Bode, L. (2012). Human milk oligosaccharides: Every baby needs a sugar mama. Glycobiology, 22(9), 1147-1162. (https://academic.oup.com/glycob/article/22/9/1147/1879160)

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    6. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA). (2014). Scientific Opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formulae. EFSA Journal 2014; 12(7):3760. (https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2014.3760)

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    11. European Food Safety Authority. (2010). Scientific Opinion on the appropriate age for introduction of complementary feeding of infants. EFSA Journal 2009; 7(12):1423. (https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2009.1423)

    12. Lönnerdal, B. (2017). Development of gastrointestinal and pancreatic functions in human neonates. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 65, S12-S18. (https://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltext/2017/10001/Development_of_Gastrointestinal_and_Pancreatic.4.aspx)

    13. Bode, L. (2012). Human milk oligosaccharides: Every baby needs a sugar mama. Glycobiology, 22(9), 1147-1162. (https://academic.oup.com/glycob/article/22/9/1147/1879160)

    14. Koletzko B, et al. (2016). Can infant feeding choices modulate later obesity risk? Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89:1502S–8S. (https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/89/5/1502S/4596953)

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    16. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA). (2014). Scientific Opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formulae. EFSA Journal 2014; 12(7):3760. (https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2014.3760)

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    18. Fidler Mis, N., et al. (2017). Sugar in Infants, Children and Adolescents: A Position Paper of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Committee on Nutrition. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2017 Dec;65(6):681-696. (https://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltext/2017/12000/Sugar_in_Infants,_Children_and_Adolescents__A.22.aspx)

    19. European Commission - Food Safety. (2017). Infant formulae and follow-on formulae. (https://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/labelling_nutrition/special_groups_food/children_en)

    20. European Parliament. (2011). Regulation (EU) No 609/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council on food intended for infants and young children, food for special medical purposes, and total diet replacement for weight control. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/ALL/?uri=CELEX%3A32013R0609)

    Always consult with a healthcare professional for advice tailored to individual circumstances.

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